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 k / o
                                       politics + culture

Monday, October 03, 2005

argh

I realize that those Iraq essays (since edited, but still long) were more than just "blogspot" straining...they may be just counter-productively long period!

I'm still learning here. And I apologize to those readers for whom the length was just too much...I know that even reading the essays I linked to would take hours.

Bear with me. I hope to make future posts informative....but, you know, also...readable in one sitting too.


thanks for reading,
paul.

5 Comments:

  • In the dark times, will there also be singing?
    Yes, there will be singing.
    About the dark times.

    --Brecht

    Keep singing, k/o. Even if it sometimes feels like you're singing alone, into the dark. Out here in the growing gloom we're still listening, and thinking, and taking hope (or trying to)...

    "I leant upon a coppice gate
    When Frost was spectre-gray,
    And Winter's dregs made desolate
    The weakening eye of day.
    The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
    Like strings of broken lyres,
    And all mankind that haunted nigh
    Had sought their household fires.

    The land's sharp features seemed to be
    The Century's corpse outleant,
    His crypt the cloudy canopy,
    The wind his death-lament.
    The ancient pulse of germ and birth
    Was shrunken hard and dry,
    And every spirit upon earth
    Seemed fervourless as I.

    At once a voice arose among
    The bleak twigs overhead
    In a full-hearted evensong
    Of joy illimited;
    An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small
    In blast-beruffled plume,
    Had chosen thus to fling his soul
    Upon the growing gloom.

    So little cause for carolings
    Of such ecstatic sound
    Was written on terrestrial things
    Afar or nigh around,
    That I could think there trembled through
    His happy good-night air
    Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew
    And I was unaware."
    --Thomas Hardy, "The Darkling Thrush" (Dec. 31, 1900)

    By Blogger wg, at 4:15 PM  

  • Thanks, wg.

    As always.

    By Blogger kid oakland, at 4:21 PM  

  • Paul,
    They were long, but rewarding. Reading them made me sad that we currently don't have an administration that cares about thoughtful, far-sighted policy-making that takes into account the voices of well-respected scholars and researchers.

    By Blogger Myshkin, at 6:53 PM  

  • color me wonkish, but i love long, well-written stuff. i still think this needs more exposure, one way or the other. we need a lot more out here in left blogistan than mere poll analysis and talking point pep talks. in particular, the thinking past the CW assumptions of benevolent empire and extractive economic imperialism is like a breath of fresh air.

    By Anonymous wu ming, at 10:00 PM  

  • fuck 'em

    lenght is not an issue when the stuff is good. blogs are more like laboratories than assembly lines of words.

    the beauty about this is that you can build shorter pieces out of them for reposting them elsewhere; but seriously, don't get hung up on wether they were long or not. i mean, my blog, can you imagine Billmon or Stavros, The Wonder Chicken writing short blogs? I don't think so.

    it's good work. stick your tongue out to the naysayers.

    liza
    www.culturekitchen.com

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 10:59 AM  

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